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The Science That Inspired Hustle Drops

Hustle Drops was inspired by the recent research on athletes using peppermint oil. The main active component in peppermint oil, L-Menthol, is a potent muscle relaxant and local anesthetic. The athletes exposed to peppermint oil were all around faster, smarter, tougher and stronger. The performance boost was caused by the relaxation of the tissue in the athlete's airways, allowing them to take in more oxygen, when ingesting or inhaling the peppermint oil. 

Hustle Drops has taken the idea of relaxing your airways to let in more oxygen to a whole new level. Hustle Drops is a concoction made of several potent mint oils ripe with L-Menthol, plus some additional L-Menthol infused directly into the drops.  On top of the cognitive and physical benefits of more oxygen, we've sweetened Hustle Drops with monk fruit extract, an all natural sweetener. All in all we've created a delicious, intense, elixir which will take your performance to a whole new level!

Studies That Inspired Hustle Drops

Peppermint Ingestion Decreases Blood Lactate Levels, Increases Brain Oxygen Concentration, Time To Exhaustion Increased, Power Output Increased

"Relaxation of bronchial smooth muscles, increase in the ventilation and brain oxygen concentration, and decrease in the blood lactate level"

"The results of the experiment support the effectiveness of peppermint essential oil on the exercise performance, gas analysis, spirometry parameters, blood pressure, and respiratory rate in the young male students. Relaxation of bronchial smooth muscles, increase in the ventilation and brain oxygen concentration, and decrease in the blood lactate level are the most plausible explanations."

Peppermint Ingestion Increases Grip Strength, Vertical Jump, and Peak Inspiratory Flow Rate

"increase in the grip force (36.1%), standing vertical jump (7.0%), and standing long jump (6.4%). Data obtained from the experimental group after five minutes exhibited a significant increase in the forced vital capacity in first second (FVC1)(35.1%), peak inspiratory flow rate (PIF) (66.4%), and peak expiratory flow rate (PEF) (65.1%)"

"Our results revealed significant improvement in all of the variables after oral administration of peppermint essential oil. Experimental group compared with control group showed an incremental and a significant increase in the grip force (36.1%), standing vertical jump (7.0%), and standing long jump (6.4%). Data obtained from the experimental group after five minutes exhibited a significant increase in the forced vital capacity in first second (FVC1)(35.1%), peak inspiratory flow rate (PIF) (66.4%), and peak expiratory flow rate (PEF) (65.1%), whereas after one hour, only PIF shown a significant increase as compare with the baseline and control group. At both times, visual and audio reaction times were significantly decreased. Physiological parameters were also significantly improved after five minutes. A considerable enhancement in the grip force, spiromery, and other parameters were the important findings of this study."

The Effects of Peppermint Oil Ingestion on the Ventilatory Threshold

"We found that ingestion of peppermint oil resulted in the ventilatory threshold occurring at a significantly higher percentage of VO2 max compared to placebo (70.2±2.2% of VO2 max vs 66.2±2.0% of VO2 max, p<.05)"

Peppermint oil (mentha piperita), a commonly used herbal remedy for gastrointestinal distress because of its effect of reduced smooth muscle tonicity, has been shown to improve results on pulmonary function tests, possibly due to bronchodilatory mechanisms. Given the potential benefits of peppermint on pulmonary function, our pilot study aimed to investigate the acute effects of peppermint oil ingestion on exercise performance, in particular the ventilatory threshold. Characterized as the inflection point at which pulmonary ventilation increases out of proportion to metabolic rate, the ventilatory threshold is positively associated with endurance performance. We hypothesized that a single ingestion of 1mL peppermint oil diluted in 250mL water would raise the ventilatory threshold as a percentage of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) during a cycling graded exercise test 10 minutes following ingestion. Six healthy male participants performed two graded maximal exercise tests on a cycle ergometer under randomized, single blind trials of peppermint oil and placebo. For each exercise test, agreement amongst three analytical methods was used to validate the inflection point at which the ventilatory threshold occurred. We found that ingestion of peppermint oil resulted in the ventilatory threshold occurring at a significantly higher percentage of VO2 max compared to placebo (70.2±2.2% of VO2 max vs 66.2±2.0% of VO2 max, p<.05). In contrast, VO2max values were not different between the two conditions. Our findings suggest that peppermint oil ingestion may acutely have a positive impact on the ventilatory threshold by raising the percentage of VO2max at which the ventilatory threshold occurs. Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanism through which peppermint oil elicits this response.

Efficacy of a nootropic spearmint extract on reactive agility: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel trial

"The findings of the current study demonstrate that consumption of 900 mg of PSE improved specific measures of reactive agility in a young, active population."

"An overall treatment effect (p = 0.019) was evident for increased hits with PSE on the stationary test with footplates, with between group differences at Day 30 (PSE vs. PLA: 28.96 ± 2.08 vs. 28.09 ± 1.92 hits; p = 0.040) and Day 90 (PSE vs. PLA: 28.42 ± 2.54 vs. 27.02 ± 3.55 hits; p = 0.002). On the same task, ART improved (treatment effect, p = 0.036) with PSE at Day 7 (PSE vs. PLA: 0.5896 ± 0.060 vs. 0.6141 ± 0.073 s; p = 0.049) and Day 30 (PSE vs. PLA: 0.5811 ± 0.068 vs. 0.6033 ± 0.055 s; p = 0.049). PSE also significantly increased hits (treatment effect, p = 0.020) at Day 30 (PSE vs. PLA: 19.25 ± 1.84 vs. 18.45 ± 1.48 hits; p = 0.007) and Day 90 (PSE vs. PLA: 19.39 ± 1.90 vs. 18.66 ± 1.64 hits; p = 0.026) for the multi-directional test with footplates. Significant differences were not observed in the remaining Makoto tests. PSE was well tolerated as evidenced by no effects observed in the blood safety panels."

Peppermint Odor Increases Running Speed, Grip Strength and Number of Push-Ups in 40 Athletes

"The peppermint odor condition resulted in increases in running speed, hand grip strength, and number of push-ups."

"Forty athletes undertook a series of physical tasks under conditions of no-odor or peppermint odor. The peppermint odor condition resulted in increases in running speed, hand grip strength, and number of push-ups, but had no effect on skill related tasks such as basketball free-throw shots. The implications are particularly salient in regard to enhancing athletic performance using a nonpharmacological aid and as an adjunct to athletic training and physical therapy."